Faustian Pacts: Stingy Jack: The Man Who Stole the Devil’s Wallet

This All Hallow’s Read is a re-telling of an Irish folktale for Enchanted Conversation Magazine, by zteve t evans, published as ALL HALLOW’S READ – Stingy Jack: The Man Who Stole the Devil’s Wallet, 14th October 2019. It tells of the infamous, Stingy Jack, (also known as Jack the Smith, Flaky Jack, or Jack of the Lantern)- a character associated with Halloween. The pumpkin jack-o-lantern may have derived from this colorful character and his interaction with the Prince of Darkness.

Stingy Jack

Way back in old Ireland several centuries ago, there was a well known character in many towns and villages across the country known as Stingy Jack. He had a silver tongue and could be very persuasive and charming yet was unquestionably a drunkard, trickster, blaggard and a man of all round devious character. 

According to legend, the Devil heard all about Jack’s tricks and deviousness and decided to see if he lived up to his evil reputation. It also has to be said, although he would never admit it, that he may have been more than a little envious of his notoriety. Maybe he thought Jack was getting too big for his boots and stealing his thunder, but anyway he decided it was time he paid him a visit, intending to carry him back to Hell.

When he arrived at Jack’s door on a Saturday night, Jack was out in the bars and pubs boozing and carousing with anyone and everyone.  Eventually, deeply inebriated and skint, he staggered homewards. After knocking on Jack’s front door several times the Devil realized it was Saturday night and Jack would surely be out on the town. He knocked one last time just in case, and as he did so, he heard someone stumbling up the garden path. As Jack staggered up the path, he suddenly became aware of a dark figure knocking loudly upon his door. 

“Hey! Who is that a-knocking on my door at this time of night when I am not in?” he drunkenly inquired.  The dark figure slowly turned and looked at Jack square in the face. Despite his drunkenness, Jack knew it was the Devil, and he had come to take him back to Hell.  

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12 thoughts on “Faustian Pacts: Stingy Jack: The Man Who Stole the Devil’s Wallet

  1. Reblogged this on Lilaia Moreli – Words Are Sacred and commented:
    The Devil has often been portrayed in Christian narrative as a malicious trickster, delighting in trapping his victins in the fiery pits of Hell, eternally tormenting them without mercy. But apart from being a nightmarish figure striking terror, in some tales he’s also foolish and naive in a most charming and funny fashion. The following blog post offers us such a humorous story.

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